[[ download Best ]] Hello World: Being Human in the Age of AlgorithmsAuthor Hannah Fry – Replica-watches.co

[[ download Best ]] Hello World: Being Human in the Age of AlgorithmsAuthor Hannah Fry – Replica-watches.co

Algorithms are increasingly an important part of our lives, yet even as of us become aware of this, how much do we actually stop to consider what that means How much do we stop to consider who is designing these algorithms and how they actually work And why are we willing to give up so much control to them in the first place Hello World is a short tour through the various ways in which algorithms intersect with human decision making It is neither comprehensive nor particularly in depth Nevertheless, through a few choice examples, Hannah Fry illustrates why this is an important topic and an issue we should think about often and deeply.Fry has organized the book into 7 discrete chapters Power, Data, Justice, Medicine, Cars, Crime, and Art Each chapter explores the role of algorithms in these parts of our society Fry intersperses explanations of various algorithms with anecdotes, many of which, as she notes about the now infamous story of Target outing a teenager s pregnancy, the reader might already have heard I believe that one of Fry s goals is to demonstrate for the reader how algorithms aren t exotic animals confined to the zoo of a computer science lab They have real world applications and real world effects.It s probably inevitable that I compare this to Weapons of Math Destruction , given the similarity of these two books Cathy O Neil blurbed Hello World as well very good job, marketing team Honestly, the subject matter of these two books is very similar, yet I m not willing to say that one is better than the other O Neil writes from the perspective of a mathematician who spent a significant part of her career embedded in the financial sector Fry is a mathematician who studies Big Data from as an academic career Many of the concepts elucidated in Weapons of Math Destruction make an appearance here, and Fry often draws similar conclusions as O Neil Whereas O Neil is mostly concerned with the negative effects of algorithms, however, I d argue that Fry is interested in raising our awareness about the complexity of these algorithms.This is a math book at its finest by which I mean it s a math book with very few equations in it Lay people often assume a good mathematics book needs a lot of formulas and numbers, and that s not true Math isn t formulas that s engineering sorry not sorry Math is about developing a system for solving problems creatively Fry breaks down what an algorithm is in simple terms, and I loved the chapters on Medicine and Cars, because Fry uses these to explain some great statistical concepts false positives and negatives, in the former and Bayesian inference, in the latter So even though a lot of the anecdotes, specific algorithm examples, etc., were already familiar to me, I still enjoyed how Fry tackles these fundamental but often overlooked mathematical ideas As a fan of graph theory and decision math, I also liked the discussion of random forests Fry spends a lot of time discussing how algorithms can get thing wrong She points out perhaps obviously that algorithms will never have human judgment algorithms can t be empathetic or sympathetic She illustrates how an algorithm is always going to be biased, so we should be less concerned with chasing after objective algorithms but instead focus on building algorithms that are honest about their biases The problem with machine learning is two fold it s the data sets we feed in, but it s also the fact that the decision making that leads to the output is often opaque.For all that Fry paints a dire picture, though, she presents a balanced viewpoint that also endorses algorithms as potentially beneficial and necessary In the Medicine chapter, she points out that algorithmic recognition of diseases like breast cancer is going to make the healthcare system efficient as long as these tools are used in conjunction with human judgment, not as a replacement for it These sentiments are echoed in every chapter, from her exploration of the justice system to her explication of driverless cars, repeated once at the end of the book where she mentions Kasparov s centaur chess If Fry is correct, then perhaps our optimal future is a cyborg future one in which algorithms enhance our decision making and help defuse the fallibility of our human judgment, but where humans remain in control of the ultimate decision process and can audit the algorithm.Hello World is a clear, easy to follow discussion of an extremely relevant topic in today s society If, like me, you re well read on this subject already, there isn t a lot of new stuff in here but I suspect you ll probably find something Even so, you ll hopefully appreciate Fry s talent for writing and explaining these ideas As for anyone who has only recently become interested in this subject, you ll not find many books that explain these ideas so well Like I said above, this pairs nicely with Weapons of Math Destruction read both Among all of the staggeringly impressive, mindboggling things that data and statistics can tell me, how it feels to be human isn t one of them. This is the book I ve been searching for, the book I had been hoping for when I read Weapons of Math Destruction How Big Data Increases Inequality and Threatens Democracy a couple of months ago Both books cover similar concepts and even examples, but while I found Weapons overly negative and pessimistic, Fry wonderfully covers both the problems and the huge, huge benefits of using algorithms and statistics Because, really, if algorithms were only negative, we wouldn t be using them, would we Fry s arguments and conclusions that we should be using the strengths of algorithms to supplement human decision making and get round human weaknesses, and vice versa are balanced and well evidenced On top of being highly informative, reading this book was just so much fun Fry has a fantastic sense of humour and writes in a way that I believe makes the book accessible for anyone Don t worry if you re not mathematically inclined, Fry makes sure to explain the concepts well and it s very easy to follow.I can t fault this book I loved every second of it and feel much informed on this area now I apologise in advance to all my friends, because I predict I am not going to shut up about this book and will be raving about it any chance I can get. ir viena interesanta un izklaid jo a gr mata par algoritmiem, j , es las ju par programm anu, statistiku, matem tikas teor m m un ik pa laikam ska i iesm jos, un atkl ju sev nezin mus veidus, kuros tiek izmantoti algoritmi, k ar guvu priek statu, k tad sti vi i str d un k das probl mas rada.Interneta izmanto anas v stures un personas datu anal ze, medic n slim bu diagnostic an , tiesu praks , noziegumu izmekl an un prevent vo pas kumu veik anai, autopiloti lidma n s un ce uz bezpilota transporta l dzek iem, m kslas filmu un m zikas popularit tes prognoz ana un pat m zikas rad ana t s ir tikai visp r jos vilcienos ieskic tas algoritma daudz s sejas Bet nekas nav perfekts, glu i k cilv ks k das, ar algoritmi nav perfekti Fascin jo i. A copy of this was provided free of charge from the publisher in return for an honest review.We rely on the computers and the internet for almost everything these days, it is the backbone of our infrastructure, our first point of social contact for friends and associates all around the world, supplies our film and music choices and is a substantial part of the economy now As the digital world permeates our life further computers are being used as part of, or in some cases the entire part of the decision process For all those of you who laughed at the Computer Says No sketch in Little Britain, life might not always be so funny now The question that Fry poses in her book is Who would you rather decide your future an algorithm or a human In answering this simple question Fry takes us on a tour of the history of the algorithm, where and how they are being used and the possible implications of our dependency on them We learn of the first algorithms that reached the point where they could beat a grandmaster at chess and how leaving human like pauses disconcerted him How sat nav can be a blessing and a curse, how facial recognition can spot the suspect in a crowd and how human error can ensure a decade of misery for an individual passing through passport control.Every click you make online is saved an analysed by the government and private corporations The authorities are seeking the ghosts in the machine and to a company, you re just a product that someone can make money out of Your future might be decided by a pigeon too as Fry explains in the chapter on health and how pattern recognition is being used to evaluate biopsy s for cancers and if you have been really bad, you may not stand in front of a judge, but be sentenced by a computer that would not care one bit about extenuating circumstances frightening stuff Algorithms have been used successfully to narrow down the search parameters for those who have committed the most serious crimes and are being used to predict where crimes might take place, the first steps towards Minority Report Even a subject like art is succumbing to the computer code, what you watch or listen to, prompts suggestions of what else to watch or hear.To say this book was eye opening would be an understatement Fry does not go too heavy on the computer and technology in here, rather she relies on the stories that show how we are all affected by algorithms and the way that they are shaping our lives This thought provoking writing has a clarity about it that will make this accessible to almost anyone who picks it up We do need to use algorithms to our advantage I worry that we re not at the moment and that we may reach a point where we won t be able to control them. Rivetting Engaging Funny Hannah Fry takes on the tyrannical influence of algorithms But doesn t cast a future of doom, sounding like a luddite The book is a refreshing take on how we could have a framework where we understand and accept AI for its flaws, and make decisions aided by it while questioning its power at each stage. Great read This caught my eye as it was passing through the library on its way to fill a patron s hold I think I had algorithms view spoiler Sorry, Brittany hide spoiler Not much of a look inside algorithms I was hoping for math but I might be in the minority with that.She s a personable writer but most of what is collected is just that A compilation of contemporary observations gleaned from many open sources. wietna ksi ka, od kt rej powinienem rozpocz wgryzanie si w temat technologia obawy i nadzieje Autorka jest matematyczk zatem kompetencji i szczeg lnej znajomo ci tematu nie mo na jej odm wi.A ksi ka dotyczy znaczenia algorytm w w naszym yciu Nieodwracalnej chyba e nadejdzie kataklizm lub antytechniczna rewolucja i nieuniknionej zale no ci od nich Kt ra w zasadzie ju jest faktem Autorka na przyk adzie niemal ka dej istotnej dziedziny ycia wykazuje z czym to uzale nienie si wi e Fakt, wskazuje do czego prowadzi w zakresie bezpiecze stwa, porz dku publicznego, medycyny, prawa, edukacji i jak bardzo s one zawodne i jak nasza lepa w ich skuteczno wiara prowadzi a i b dzie prowadzi do nieszcz cia Ksi ka jest bogato udokumentowana, dwadzie cia procent zawarto ci to przypisy I stanowi ostrze enia, jedno z wielu, ale kompetentne aby nie polega lepo, weryfikowa , nie wierzy w obiektywizm algorytm w Ale si ich nie ba , zw aszcza e na strach ju za p no A na zdrowy rozs dek jeszcze nie. Thoroughly researched and balanced that expected, but still problematic As a librarian Information Science professional, I have serious qualms with the argument that we should learn to live with algorithms machines controlling functions of society Yes, I see the benefits and potential Yes, I agree that better developed algorithms can improve quality of life But, I think the folks who develop tech often forget that an algorithm a machine should never be depended upon to make humane decisions nor is it a reliable agent of Effective Altruism Let me put it this way An algorithm does not breathe or think It cannot express democratic values, no matter how sophisticated it is It does not know how to critically think its only goal is to complete a program and meet a target It does not value privacy Algorithms will never give a shit about us. I cannot live with the idea that I should be coerced to surrender my free will or private information in order to improve someone else s algorithm Some things are too unpredictable to be entrusted to a machine That is what we should really learn to live with. When It Comes To Artificial Intelligence, We Either Hear Of A Paradise On Earth Or Of Our Imminent Extinction It S Time We Stand Face To Digital Face With The True Powers And Limitations Of The Algorithms That Already Automate Important Decisions In Healthcare, Transportation, Crime, And Commerce Hello World Is Indispensable Preparation For The Moral Quandaries Of A World Run By Code, And With The Unfailingly Entertaining Hannah Fry As Our Guide, We Ll Be Discussing These Issues Long After The Last Page Is Turned